Articles

Common Behaviour Problems

The following are some of the more common behaviour problems I come across and how they may impact on you the owner or your family.

1. JUMPING UP

i. Embarrassing when visitors arrive.
ii. Frightening if the person is a child or the dog large.
iii. Socially unacceptable, not all people are dog friendly.
iv. Clothing may be damaged or made dirty.
v. Allows the dog to be dominant, which demeans the owner.

2. ISOLATION ANXIETY

i. Effects the planning of day-to-day activities.
ii. Causes concerns about what happens when you are absent.
iii. Excessive demands on owners’ company within the house
iv. Frustration for friends and family, when the dog seems to come first.
v. Destruction of furniture and household items has a financial implication

3. PLAY BITING

i. Concern that puppy play biting develops into a display of dominance.
ii. Dangerous where children are concerned.
iii. Embracement for the owner, dog has the upper hand.
iv. Owner may be frightened.
v. Inclination is to isolate the dog to prevent he/she biting a visitor.

4. TOLERENCE TO A HEALTH CHECK

i. Owner wary of handling the dog. Snarling and growling puts them off.
ii. Reliant upon the vet to check problems causing stress to dog and owner.
iii. Financial implications, expensive vet bills (sedation).
iv. Dominance issues, dog does not accept invasion of his/her body space.
v. Places doubts in the owners mind about the trustworthiness of the dogs temperament.

5. EXCESSIVE BARKING

i. Frustration with living with a noisy dog.
ii. Effects relationship with neighbours.
iii. Causes family arguments.
iv. Disappointment with the relationship you have with your dog.
v. Allows dog to control your actions, i.e. letting it out or feeding it on demand.

6. SELECTIVE DEAFNESS

i. Owner thinks the dog is stupid.
ii. Lack of control of the dog limits activities.
iii. Frustration at their inability to train their dog.
iv. Dog adapts to life without much input from the owners and becomes more independent.
v. The dog may develop more undesirable behaviours that would cause stress within the family due to it having to find stimulation elsewhere i.e. chasing other dogs/people.

7. DESTRUCTIVE BEHAVIOUR

i. Confusion that the behaviour is normal, particularly if the dog is young.
ii. Frustration, failing to understand that punishing the dog on your return home when you find chewed items has not worked.
iii. Arguments amongst family members when prized possessions are destroyed.
iv. Start to resent the dogs position in the house.
v. Other rows may develop when considering how to deal with the problem.

8. REFUSING TO COME WHEN CALLED

i. Embarrassment when the dog refuses to come back when called in a public place.
ii. Find excuses not to take the dog on their required exercise.
iii. Other behavioural problems may have to be dealt with caused by excess energy the dog has due to the restricted exercise regime.
iv. Concerns about the losing the dog.
v. Worried the dog may cause an accident.

9. EXCESSIVE ATTENTION SEEKING

i. Embarrassment when visitors are at the house.
ii. Interferes with lifestyle, causing frustration.
iii. Begin to resent the dog pestering for attention.
iv. Can cause arguments within the family if members disagree with what constitutes excessive attention.
v. Nudging or pawing the arm can cause an accident with small children or hot drinks.

10. SELECTIVE OBEDIENCE DUE TO DISTRACTIONS

i. Embarrassment when walking the dog in a public place.
ii. Disappointment that the dog chooses not to interact with the owner
iii. Thinking the dog is unintelligent.
iv. Frustration when allowing the dog to dictate where or how fast the walk actually goes. Having to wait for it to sniff at a lamppost or patch of grass.
v. Limiting the time you take your dog or the location restricts the dogs stimulation, which may lead to other behavioural issues for you to deal with.