Articles

Choosing Your Dog

I have been aware of the many different breeds of dog for many years. I do breed German Shepherd Dogs and Large Munsterlanders. I have also owned Border Collies and a Golden Retriever. This has given me experience of the different predisposed behaviours between these breeds. All of which have been reared in similar circumstances, but are very different characters.

breedsWhat amazes me is the lack of knowledge people have about their chosen breed. They may have seen one specimen of the breed in question that happens to be well trained. An opinion is then formed on these limited circumstances that the breed is the dog for them. Take Munsterlanders for example, they are hunt, point, and retrieve gundogs with limitless energy. Wonderful characters very sociable, love cuddles especially when wet after a good swim. They have a tendency to separation anxiety if not taught at an early age to be left. Perfect family dogs for outdoor types that enjoy long walks in all weathers. So many people contact me for a Munsterlander puppy with no idea what they would be taking on.

I do think in this modern society everything is too easy and available. If someone feels a dog is the status symbol they are lacking then they buy one, as easy as that. The family may have moved to a rural area to improve their ”life work balance”. Dad may want to learn to shoot, so decides a gundog is the thing to have. They really do fail to research the breed and have a poor understanding of what training and owning a dog is all about. At the opposite end of the scale are the Staffordshire Bull Terrier types that youths have as status symbols. It is too easy to breed and sell these puppies without any thought or planning. So many of them are abandoned and end up in rescue centres, with real behavioural issues and very little hope of having a good life.

There are so many wonderful breeds of dog in the world, with a little research and help from responsible breeders there is a dog with the correct breed traits for most types of home. They do not all enjoy romping through muddy fields, swimming and hunting. Many have been bred to fulfil the role of companion without a need for excessive exercise. They love nothing more than the opportunity curl up on a lap. Personal preference is fundamental in the decision of type of dog we choose, we are all different and have different requirements from our pets. There will always be a space in modern society for a companion dog; there is no other animal that is capable of fitting in with our very different lifestyles and giving so much whilst asking for so little in return.